If you have ever taken your child to the cardiologist, there is a good chance your child had a test called an echocardiogram performed. If they did, you may have wondered, what exactly is an echocardiogram and how does it work?

An echocardiogram, or “echo” for short, is a non-invasive test that many cardiologists use to evaluate the structure and function of the heart. This test uses ultrasound waves (high-pitched sound waves) to recreate an image of the heart on a computer screen. In essence, the echocardiogram is a video depiction of the heart in real time.

When your child is diagnosed with a heart problem it is very concerning. Understanding all you can about their condition is important to alleviate stress and anxiety. It is also important to understand the medications your child might take for a heart condition. One of these medications is called Enalapril.

When your child is diagnosed with a heart problem it is very concerning. Understanding all you can about their condition is important to alleviate stress and anxiety. It is also important to understand the medications your child might take for a heart condition. One of these medications is called Digoxin.

Down syndrome, or Trisomy 21, is a condition where extra genetic material causes mental and physical delays and deficits. It affects around 1 in every 800 babies born in the United States. The medical problems associated with Down syndrome can vary widely; while some children require complex medical needs, others lead healthy lives.

Trisomy 21 was first described in 1887 by a British doctor, John Langdon Down. It wasn’t until 1959, however, that the cause was identified. Normal at the time of conception, a baby inherits genetic information from its parents equally, with 23 chromosomes from the mother and 23 from the father (totaling 46 chromosomes). In most cases of Down syndrome, the child receives an extra chromosome 21, and it is this extra material that causes the physical features and developmental delays associated with Down syndrome.

Anybody familiar with the sport of basketball has probably heard of Pete Maravich. Pistol Pete, as he was called, was an amazing talent.

Following a successful high school career, he played college basketball for LSU in the late 1960’s. His college statistics are so amazing as to seem almost absurd. He is still the all-time NCAA scoring leader with 3,667 points. Over his three-year college career he averaged an incredible 44.2 points per game. In addition, these accomplishments were achieved prior to the institution of the 3 point line. Experts surmise that he probably would have averaged close to 50 points per game had the 3 point line been in effect at that time. Suffice it to say that Pistol Pete’s scoring records will never be broken. In fact, I think it's safe to say they will never even be remotely challenged!

Pistol Pete went on to a very successful professional basketball career. He retired from basketball in 1980. Eight years later, at the age of 40, he passed away suddenly while playing a pickup basketball game at his church in California. Friends, family, and fans across the nation were shocked. How could such a young and seemingly healthy person die at such a young age?

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